Smooth Artichoke Hummus Dip

Artichoke hummus in a blue bowl surrounded by cucumber, carrots, and pita bread on a white surface

This smooth artichoke hummus dip has been updated to be super creamy and delicious! It will be a major hit at your next party.

I’m getting together with a few old coworkers tonight and we were all discussing what to make for snacks. Naturally, hummus was one of the first ideas to come up. I’m not sure when hummus got so huge but now you’ll see it on every menu and at every party, especially baby showers. We’ve all gotten pretty picky about our standard hummus, but how often do you see artichoke hummus? If you say “often”, then I want to know where you live because there is only one place in Dallas that serves it and that is Ziziki’s.

Ziziki’s hummus is so delicious and unique, but it also costs an arm and half your leg to order a tiny little bowl at the restaurant. Because of this I started googling artichoke hummus and actually came across the recipe on their website! Not sure why they would share it, but I’m so glad they did because now I can share it with you. The other positive is I believe it fits the paleo diet if that’s your thing.

The original recipe has 3 cups of artichoke hearts and 2 tablespoons of tahini, rather than the below mix of chickpeas and artichoke hearts.

The Secret to Creamy Hummus

Now that I’ve made the original recipe a few times, I realized that I much prefer adding chickpeas to the mix. They subdue the flavor of the artichokes just slightly, and provide a really nice creaminess to the overall texture. The best way to get any hummus to be super creamy is to either used soaked, dried chickpeas or to simmer canned chickpeas for about 20 minutes with 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda. This loosens the skins and softens the chickpeas.

Artichokes and garlic in a food processor

Artichokes and Citric Acid

Their original recipe does have lemon in it, and it’s really hard to give up lemon in your hummus for HYH. I do feel like this version has a little more flavor than your standard chickpea recipe so you don’t miss it as much. Since I also don’t see many people wanting to peel their own artichokes, you’ll have to go with either canned or frozen. The issue is most include citric acid to keep them from browning.

Don’t let this deter you, as citric acid is still considered safe on the Heal Your Headache diet, even though some people find it to be a trigger. If that’s all you can find and everything else in it is clean, just let your artichokes soak in fresh, cold water for about 10 minutes and then drain. Rinse very thoroughly a few times and squeeze out any excess water.

Don’t Skip the Za’atar for Citrus Flavor

Za’atar (pronouced zah-tar) is a Mediterranean spice blend that typically consists of oregano, sesame seeds and sumac. It’s typically found in the bulk aisle of your grocery store spices. It’s a great way to add the flavor you’re missing from lemon juice, which is not allowed on a low tyramine migraine diet.

Pita bread dipped in artichoke hummus with carrots and cucumbers in the backgroun

Creamy Artichoke Hummus Dip
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Resting Time
20 mins
Total Time
55 mins
 

This artichoke hummus is heavy on the artichokes, but also combines 1/2 a can of chickpeas for a creamy, smooth texture. Vegan and gluten free, this dip will be a hit at any party!

Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: Vegan
Keyword: Artichoke Hummus, Creamy, Vegan
Servings: 4 people
Author: The Dizzy Cook
Ingredients
Artichoke Hummus
  • 1/2 14oz can garbanzo beans/chickpeas, drained
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 14oz can or defrosted package of artichoke hearts, drained
  • 1/4 cup tahini
  • 1-2 garlic cloves, either 1 large or 2 small
  • 1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar
  • 1/2 tsp greek oregano
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional: za'atar to sprinkle on top
  • fresh cucumber, carrots, and celery for dipping
  • HYH compliant pita bread - I get mine fresh baked at Central Market but just watch out for malted barley flour and yogurt in yours
Instructions
  1. Drain 1/2 can chickpeas and place them in a small pot (the others can be reserved for salad toppings or more hummus). Cover them with water and add 1/2 teaspoon baking soda. Bring the chickpeas to a boil over medium-high heat and then turn down to medium low to simmer for about 20 minutes. Transfer them to a colander to drain and then rinse with cool water.

  2. Chop drained artichoke hearts in food processor. Add the softened chickpeas, tahini, garlic clove(s), vinegar, and oregano. Slowly add olive oil until mixture is emulsified. If you like a thinner consistency, add 1-2 tablespoons of cold water into the processor. Cover and allow to sit in the fridge at least 30 minutes to let the flavors combine...if you can make it. 

  3. Brush pita with olive oil on both sides and grill on flat top or in saute pan until golden brown. Slice grilled pita into 8 pieces. Arrange pita around dip and serve. 

Recipe Notes
  • Feel free to add drained chickpeas without boiling them, but expect the consistency to not be as smooth and creamy. 
  • Za'atar contains sumac, which offers a citrus flavor that is nice when you cannot have citrus on a migraine diet. It's great for topping. I find it in the bulk spice aisles or online. 

Alicia was diagnosed with Chronic Vestibular Migraine in 2016 and has been able to successfully manage her symptoms through medication, supplements, lifestyle changes, and the Heal Your Headache Diet by Dr. David Buchholz from Johns Hopkins. She's the owner of The Dizzy Cook.

2 comments

  1. Jen

    Any suggestions for a tahini substitute? I really dislike the taste and consistency. But artichoke hummus sounds amazing!

    Reply

    1. Alicia

      It’s such a small amount, I think you could leave it out. Maybe using a little extra olive oil instead. Let me know how it goes!

      Reply

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